The morphofunctional characteristic of rodenties’ intestine

N. A. Slesarenko, Doctor of Biological Sciences, Professor, Head of the Department of anatomy and histology of animals by A. F. Klimov;

V.A. Komiakova, postgraduate student of the Department of anatomy and histology of animals by A. F. Klimov;

V.V. Stepanishin, Сandidate of Biological Sciences, assistant Professor of the Department of anatomy and histology of animals by A. F. Klimov

Federal State Budgetary Educational Institution of Higher Education “Moscow state Academy of Veterinary Medicine and Biotechnology - MVA by K.I. Skryabin” (Moscow SAVMB)

Russia, 109472, Moscow, 23 Academician Scriabin st.

E-mail: slesarenko2009@yandex.ru

Abstract

General regularities and specific features of the anatomical structure of the intestine in the studied representatives of the rodent order were established, reflecting the influence of both the genetic program of morphogenesis of the species and the alimentary factor. It was found that the buttoned thickening is the outlet of the common bile duct, which also participates in the regulation of the volume of food masses coming from the stomach. In the Guinea pig the risk of acute obstruction in the duodenum is minimized due to the protrusion of the mucous membrane in the lumen of the intestine. The intestinal canal of the chinchilla is characterized by the following anatomical features: the intestinal wall gradually thins towards the rectum, throughout the intestinal canal in the submucosal basis a large number of Peyer plaques and diffuse accumulations of lymphoid tissue are concentrated.

It is established that the chinchilla blind-rim valve is endowed with a complex morphology: its folds are formed by all layers of the intestinal wall with Peyer plaques in the submucosal base, and in the leaves of the roller are concentrated clusters of Panet cells. Representatives of the order rodents colon has two muscle bands (tenii) and a pouch of the colon, taking part in the organization of the digestive process.

Representatives of phytophages in the intestine revealed the areas of the highest concentration of lymphoid tissue: cranial bend of the duodenum, ileum-blind-colon mouth and colon pouch. In chinchilla as additional sources of lymphoid tissue acts iliac-colonic ring of the blind-rim valve.

Identified areas of risk and development of entomopathology the studied animal hepatic flexure duodenum and ileum-blind-colon connection, tapicerki associated with structural formations: globular bellied thickening, ileal-cecal sphincter and blind-colic valve that perform a compensatory function to counter obstruction of the lumen of the intestinal canal.

The thick section of the studied animals is responsible for the formation and division of the content into hard and soft feces, and its histological features are adapted to the separate function and the formation of two types of feces.

The presented data Supplement the information in the field of gastroenterology of laboratory animals, are basic for experimental, clinical morphology in the assessment of structural and functional state of the intestine.

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