Urine collecting samples from laboratory animals (overview)

E.I. Trofimets, Toxicologist,
A.E. Katel'nikova, PhD, Toxicology Team Leader,
K.L. Kryshen', PhD, Head of Toxicology and Microbiology Department

Institute of Pre-Сlinical Research Ltd.,
3, Zavodskaya St., Build. 245, Kuzmolovsky Urban-Type Settlement, Vsevolozhsky District, Leningrad Region, 188663, Russia
Е-mail: trofimets.ei@doclinika.ru

Abstract

Collecting and laboratory analysis of urine samples from experimental animals is often a primary part of the preclinical studies of drugs necessary to assess the state of the kidneys and urinary tract. The main requirements for collecting urine samples from experimental animals are: collecting clean urine samples without contamination by feces, feed or other impurities, simplicity and convenience, efficiency and speed of collection. The method of collecting urine mainly depends on the purpose of the study (collecting a one-time sample or a sample collected over a period of time), the body size of the laboratory animal and the volume of the sample to be obtained. Currently, there are a quite huge number of methods for collecting urine samples, but each of them requires technical skills and testing in laboratory conditions in order to obtain pure biological samples in sufficient volumes for analysis. In laboratory practice, when choosing a method for collecting biological samples, it is necessary to give priority to methods that are simple to perform, convenient and, if possible, minimally traumatic for animals. Particular attention should be paid to the development of stress and discomfort in animals with a particular method of collecting urine samples, since it is impossible to obtain reliable research results with animals in stress. The article is a review of literature data on collecting urine samples from various types of laboratory animals. The search for articles published in English was carried out in the Google Scholar and PubMed databases, in Russian – in the database of the scientific electronic library eLIBRARY.RU. A comparative analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of various methods for collecting urine samples from different animal species has been performed. This article not only describes the methods for obtaining urine samples, but also focuses on the welfare of animals and the development of stress when using one or another method of collecting urine samples.

Full text avaliable in Russain only

Author Contributions


E.I. Trofimets – literary data collection, data collection and analysis, swriting and editing of the text

A.E. Katelnikova – supervised the project

K.L. Kryshen – supervised the project, editing of the text, supervised the project, approved the final version of the manuscript

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